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How to keep your Get & Post ViewModels DRY

I’ve been convinced that I should not be using the same view model class for both loading the view and the posted controller action parameter. The trouble is it allows data to be transferred back which may not be necessary and it needlessly increases our attack surface. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve always had unit tests specifically monitoring that only necessary view model properties are being pushed back to the entity model, but still, seperate viewmodels will allow me to eliminate that risk completely and even remove those tests. To be honest, the idea of having 2 view model classes that are nearly identical is not very appealing, especially given that if the structure deviates, the default model binder will no longer work with those properties which are out of sync with its partner view model. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very liberal when it comes to class quantities, but this was enough to make me uncomfortable. So I’m happy that I realized the post view model class can always be used as a base class for the get view model class. I mean it has to be in order for the default model binder to work. Using inheritance for these classes will a) keep these classes in sync so the default model binder will always work, b) follow the DRY principle and c) keep my sanity. In a nutshell, rather than having 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 public class FooViewModel { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public FooStatusEnum Status { get; set; } public DateTime CreateDate { get; set; } } We can instead have 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 public class FooPostViewModel { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } }   public class FooGetViewModel : FooPostViewModel { public FooStatusEnum Status { get; set; } public DateTime CreateDate { get; set; } } So FooGetViewModel is loaded and passed into the view. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [HttpGet] public ActionResult Edit(int Id) { var vm = new FooGetViewModel(); // populate view model return View(vm); } And FooPostViewModel is the parameter in our controller action, receiving everything necessary, but only what is necessary. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [HttpPost, ActionName("Edit")] public ActionResult EditPost(FooPostViewModel vm) { // get foo // update foo with the vm data // redirect back to detail... read more

My Clean Code Experience No. 1 (with before and after code examples)

Public Code Review Robert C. Martin was kind enough to review the code in this post at on his new blog Clean Coder. Be sure to read his review when you finish reading this post. Introduction After expressing an interest in reading Robert C Martin‘s books, one of my Twitter followers was kind enough to give me a copy of Uncle Bob’s book Clean Code as a gift*. This post is about my first refactoring experience after reading it and the code resulting from my first Clean Code refactor. Sample code The code used in this post is based on the data access layer (DAL) used in a side project I’m currently working on. Specifically, my sample project is based on a refactor on the DAL classes for comment data. The CommentData class and surrounding code was simplified for the example, in order to focus on the DAL’s refactoring, rather than the comment functionality. Of course; the comment class could be anything. Download the my clean code refactor sample project (VS2008) Please notice: 1. The database can be generated from the script in the SQL folder 2. This code will probably make the most sense if you step through it 3. This blog post is about 1,700 words, so if you aren’t into reading, you will still get the jist of what I’m saying just from examining the source code. What Clean Code isn’t about Before starting, I want to point out that Clean Code is not about formatting style. While we all have our curly brace positioning preferences, it really is irrelevant. Clean Code strikes at a much deeper level, and although your ‘style’ will be affected tremendously, you won’t find much about formatting style. My original code My original comment DAL class is in the folder called Dirty.Dal, and contains one file called CommentDal.cs containing the CommentDal class. This class is very typical of how I wrote code before reading this book**. The original CommentDal class is 295 lines of code all together and has a handful of well named methods. Now, 295 lines of code is hardly awful, it doesn’t seem very complex relatively speaking, and really, we’ve all seen (and coded) worse. Although the class interface does seem pretty simple, the simplicity of its class diagram hides its code complexity. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25... read more

How To Get The Most Frequently Used Column Values

Whenever I import external data, integrate to another database, or am new to a project, I need to get familiar with the database. The table schemas, relational integrity, and constraints are the first thing I look at and take me a long way, but soon I need to know what the data looks like.

In an ideal world, relational integrity and database constraints would define control this, and all I’d really need to do is look at those. But the reality is, in 15 years of working in this industry, most of the databases I’ve worked on, that I didn’t design, have barely used constraints and some haven’t even used relation integrity fully!

The need to get a good feel of the data is even more prevalent when working with dirty data, or when refactoring poorly written applications to ensure any refactoring doesn’t introduce other issues. I will usually wind up writing the following query repeatedly:
….

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How To Guarantee Dependent JavaScript Files are Included

I’m very much a statically typed kind of programmer and knowing that missing code will not be found, until executed, and then only when it hits that missing code … well, lets just say it makes me … uneasy … actually, I’m nervous as heck every time I run it! I feel like my app is held together with duct tape! …. a house of cards waiting to collapse with the next gentle breeze.

When I started programming in JavaScript, this really bothered me. In addition to my ‘uneasy’ feeling, there was the constant aggravation of missing dependencies. This was more than uneasiness; this was an irritating thorn in my side. It was again only compounded by the fact, that if there were 5 missing dependencies, I would only find them one at a time, and only if I happened to be so luck as to covered it’s reference in my GUI testing!

Wouldn’t it be nice if my code would tell me on the first run ever dependent file that was missing?

I thought so; so I came up with this little trick to test if a JavaScript file is included already. Basically, …

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How To Write Dynamic SQL AND Prevent SQL Injection Attacks

One of my pet peeves is when general rules are taken as gospel, and declared as the only acceptable practice regardless of the circumstance. One of the big ones is Dynamic SQL. There’s a heck of a good reason for this, and it’s called an SQL Injection Attack, and if you are not familiar with it, I would strongly urge you to leave this post right now, and read up on it. Anyway, Dynamic SQL is not inherently evil, it’s the appending of user entered text that is evil. Appending user entered text is just lazy and can be easily avoided with parameterization. The trick is to create dynamic SQL …

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